Out Of The Cloud & Into The Fog: FOG COMPUTING

 

First, everything was in “the cloud” but today’s new buzzword is “fog computing.”  No, it doesn’t have anything to do with the weather phenomenon, but rather with how we store and access data.

 

Fog computing, also known as fog networking or fogging, is a decentralized computing infrastructure in which data, compute, storage and applications are distributed in the most logical, efficient place between the data source and the cloud. Fog computing essentially extends cloud computing and services to the edge of the network, bringing the advantages and power of the cloud closer to where data is created and acted upon.

Fog networking supports the Internet of Things (IoT) concept, in which most of the devices used by humans on a daily basis will be connected to each other. Examples include phones, wearable health monitoring devices, connected vehicles and augmented reality using devices such as the google glass.

 

FOG COMPUTING VS CLOUD COMPUTING

Both cloud computing and fog computing provide storage, applications, and data to end-users. However, fog computing has a bigger proximity to end-users and bigger geographical distribution.

Cloud Computing – the practice of using a network of remote servers hosted on the Internet to store, manage, and process data, rather than a local server or a personal computer. Cloud Computing can be a heavyweight and dense form of computing power.

Fog computing – a term created by Cisco that refers to extending cloud computing to the edge of an enterprise’s network. Also known as Edge Computing or fogging, fog computing facilitates the operation of computing, storage, and networking services between end devices and cloud computing data centers. Fog computing is a medium weight and intermediate level of computing power.

Fog computing is used for storage data on global level

WHY FOGGING?

Fog model provides benefits in advertising, computing, entertainment and other applications, well positioned for data analytics and distributed data collection points. End services like, set-up-boxes and access points can be easily hosted using fogging. It improves QoS and reduces latency. The main task of fogging is positioning information near to the user at the network edge

 

FOGGING ADVANTAGES :

 

  • The significant reduction in data movement across the network resulting in reduced congestion, cost, and latency, elimination of bottlenecks resulting from centralized computing systems, improved security of encrypted data as it stays closer to the end user reducing exposure to hostile elements and improved scalability arising from virtualized systems.
  • Eliminates the core computing environment, thereby reducing a major block and a point of failure.
  • Improves the security, as data are encoded as it is moved towards the network edge.
  • Edge Computing, in addition to providing the sub-second response to end users, it also provides high levels of scalability, reliability and fault tolerance.
  • Consumes less amount of bandwidth.